Cristina Gregorin

Cristina Gregorin
Language: English, German, Italian

My background

I have been a qualified guide for the extraordinary city of Venice since 1991, over which time I have acquired ever deepening knowledge of it and shared it with pleasure. Its history from the time of its founding to the Republic and on to the present moment; its art, the many treasures in its museums and in its streets; its magnificent churches and palaces; its cultural and political life; the many anecdotes and legends that surround it, all of that and more are available to my clients.

In addition, I have a particular passion for the immense cultural heritage still present and very much alive in Venice today. Master artisans and craftspeople (about whom I published a book Venice Master Artisans and several articles); designers and artists. But beyond that are my feelings for the city’s inhabitants, their daily life and unique customs.

During my tours, I like to weave past and present together: the way of living in Venice today and the relationship of its inhabitants with the great past of this city – which for many comes as a real surprise. I like to explain the art, for example, that of Tintoretto and Bellini, by reconstructing the way their works were seen then and how we see them today.

Preserving Venice as a living entity is critical to me. For some years, I have been part of a Citizens’ Association that has taken a position on several central and very important issues, for example, the preservation of its heritage, the environmental problems of the Lagoon. We all feel very strongly that Venice must not be allowed to become only a museum. Its economic production and the vitality of its social and cultural and artistic life must be maintained.

I also offer visits to exhibitions of modern and contemporary art like the Biennale, the Guggenheim Collection, the Pinault Foundation at the Dogana and architectural walks that take you from the Byzantine style up to modern buildings. I like and emphasize the idea of contemporary arts as that of a practice of continuous innovation in dialogue with the cultural roots.

On one of my websites, www.slow-venice.com, you can find a range of tours about the history, art history and general knowledge of the city.
The second website is dedicated to modern art and architecture from the 19th century to the present day: www.contemporary-venice.com

My advice

Approach the city with an open mind. Do not think of it only as a beautiful relic of the past. Look about it for its everyday life, for its dynamic and compelling contemporary presence but don’t forget its extraordinary architecture and the artworks that you can find in our many museums and palaces.